Home / Weekly Bulletins / 2014 Bulletins / September, 2014 / September 7, 2014

St. Innocent Orthodox Church       

✙  Founded in 1967  ✙  Moscow Patriarchal Parishes  ✙                         
23300 W. Chicago    Redford, MI 48239     313-538-1142     Fax: 313-538-8126
Church Web Site: www.stinnocentchurch.org   E-Mail: frroman@firebirdvideos.com
St. Innocent Religious Community: 9452 Hazelton, Redford, MI 48239  313-535-9080

PASTOR: Rt. Rev. Mitered Archpriest ROMAN STAR
         SEPTEMBER 7, 2014                      Dean, Central States Deanery, Patriarchal Parishes
Cell Phone: 313-319-0590
ASSISTANT PRIEST: Rev. DANEIL SHIRAK   313-295-3073
DEACON: Rev. Dn. Michael Comerford
EPISTLE:  1st Corinthians 16:13 – 24 (#166)                                ATTACHED: Sister Ioanna
GOSPEL:   St. Matthew  21:33 – 42 (#87)                       CHOIR DIRECTOR: Elizabeth Star
TONE:         4                                                                        READERS: Robert Joseph Latsko

George Hanoian

✞ 13th SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST ✞

✞ Forefeast of the Nativity of the Theotokos ✞
✞ & Sunday Before the Elevation of the Holy Cross ✞

✞ 9:15 AM HOURS & AKATHIST; CONFESSIONS
✞ 10AM — DIVINE LITURGY OF ST. JOHN CHRYSOSTOM 

COMMEMORATED TODAY:  Forefeast of the Nativity of the Theotokos. Sunday before Elevation. Martyr Sozón of Cilicia (ca. 304). St. John, Archbishop and Wonderworker of Novgorod (1186). Ven. Serapion of Spaso-Eleazar Monastery (Pskov—1481). Martyrdom of St. Makáry, Archimandrite of Kanev (Pereyaslavl’—1678). Apostles Evodia (Euodias) and Onesiphorus of the Seventy (66). Martyr Eupsychius of Cæsarea in Cappadocia (2nd c.).

FOR THE REPOSE OF:  Estelle & Joseph Star; Ellen Starinshak; Anna & John Witkowski; Michael Sr.& Margaret Rusko; Mary, Andrew, Daniel, Michael & Lottie Yakuber; Ross & Margaret Falsetti; Helen, John & Carole Andrayko; Peter & Theresa Harvilla; Marc Dade; Betty Martell; Frances Smoly; Peter Glover; Irene Adams; Ethel Elizabeth & Wayne Joshua deVyver; David Horka; Michael Rusko, Anna Lichagina, Yelena & Zinaïda Korniyevskaya, Joseph Nossal

MEMORY ETERNAL

               Michelle Shirak Tucker (newly-departed, 28 August), sister of Fr. Daneil Shirak
               Julia Van Ness, whose Anniversary of her repose is Tuesday, 9 September, by niece, Mat. Rose Marie & Fr. Roman

FOR THE  HEALTH OF:  Archimandrite Roman (Braga) (terminal cancer); Archimandrite Il’ya (Barna); Igumen Seraphim; Archpriest Lawrence Bacik; Archpriest Paul Waters; Archpriest Serge Lukianov; Priest Daneil, Matushka Debra & Corrina Shirak; Deacon Michael, Matushka Mary Ellen & Julius Comerford; Matushka Melania Sviridov; Matushka Mary Donahue; Reader Robert Latsko, Reader George & Betty Hanoian, Jordan Manier, Rose Nossal, Mary Glover, Nancy Cupp, Deborah Dade, Dean Hough, Vasiliki Stamoulis, Gerald Martell,  Jaime Truskowski, Azbehat, Donald Yakuber, Carl deVyver, Jo Anne Nicholas, Joan Rusko, Gregory & Tamiko Star, Daria, Mother Theodora-Ampilochia (brain cancer); Alice Ladhu (cancer); Helen Hall (cancer)

               Tricia Harbut, who celebrates her birthday Today, Sunday, 7 September
               Gregory Everhardt, who celebrates his birthday on Friday, 12 September
               Fr.  Daneil & Mat. Debra, who celebrate their Wedding Anniversary on Friday, 12 September
               Vasiliki Stamoulis, who celebrates her birthday on Saturday, 13 September

MAY GOD GRANT THEM MANY YEARS!

SCHEDULE FOR THE COMING WEEK         
TODAY, SUNDAY   9/7,  6pm , GREAT VESPERS & LITIYA FOR GREAT FEAST OF THE NATIVITY OF THE THEOTOKOS
Monday            9/8      9am      DIVINE LITURGY FOR GREAT FEAST OF THE NATIVITY OF THE THEOTOKOS
Wednesday    9/10     7pm      Moleben or Akathist
Saturday         9/13     4pm      GREAT VESPERS & CONFESSIONS
Sunday            9/14           14th Sunday After Pentecost; & Great Feast of the Elevation of the Cross                
                                 9:15am     Hours & Akathist & Confessions    
                                    10am     DIVINE LITURGY, followed by Coffee Hour

❈  CHRIST IS IN OUR MIDST!  ❈ HE IS NOW & EVER SHALL BE!  ❈

[PRINTED BULLETIN, PAGE 2]

THE PARABLE OF THE VINEYARD
By Metropolitan Anthony of Sourozh
(St. Matthew 21:33–42)
A Sermon delivered on 24 August 1980

In the Name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.
Today's Gospel, interrupting, so to speak, a series of joyful readings, is a very terrifying one: the story of the workers in the vineyard who turned out to be traitors. And indeed this parable reflects the whole history of the human race, but in the context of all the readings that have gone before, it tells us also of the terrible, in the full sense of that word, ingratitude of mankind, including all of us, to God. In the face of all His love, all His miracles, in the face of everything that He has accomplished, we remain unmoved and self-centered; we think of ourselves, we do not think of our neighbors, still less do we think of God; ingratitude, self love, concentration on ourselves, on what we want, what appeals to us, what seems necessary to us.

Today's Gospel reading tells us that God created a whole beautiful wonderful world, fenced it with His might and His providence, prepared everything in it so that it could be the place of God's Kingdom, that is the Kingdom of mutual love, the Kingdom of joy. But we know what we, people, have made of this world: a place where men are afraid to live, where there is bloodshed, where inhuman, cruel acts are committed, and not only on a world-wide scale, but on a family scale, a parish scale, and among the closest friends.

From generation to generation the Lord has sent His messengers: patriarchs, prophets, angels, preachers, the Forerunner; and finally He came Himself to remind us that the world was created for love. And as in the parable the workers led the son out of the vineyard and killed him, so mankind treated the incarnate Son of God. And when I say ‘mankind’, I am speaking not of others, but of us ourselves, because life is entrusted to us to make of it a triumph of love, brotherhood, harmony, faith and joy, and we do not do so, because we think only of ourselves. In response to everything that God has done for us, created us, revealing Himself to us, pouring out all His love on us and finally giving us the life and death of His Son, we produce hardly anything but a brief ‘Thank you’ and instantly forget.

Turn back to everything you heard during Great Lent, to what you saw on the night of Christ's Resurrection, to what was said in all the subsequent weeks by the saints, the saints of Russia, the saints of these islands, by the Gospel of love and humanity. Consider all this and ask yourselves, ‘am I not a worker in the vineyard, and am I not one of those who pushes Christ away every time He enters my life? Do I not say: get off my path, get out of my life — I want to be the God, the master, I want to manage everything.’ Thus speaks each one of us, not so rudely, not so blasphemously, but in actions, in rotten words.

We must come to our senses. I have said many times that we are saved because God loves us; yet not by the love of God only, but by our response to this love. If our wish is merely to reap the fruits of the Cross, of the crucifixion, of the days of the passion, and return nothing to God, and give nothing to our neighbor for whom God died, except a momentary thought, we are alien to everything that God accomplished for us.

Let us therefore stand before the warning, the reminder in today's Gospel and face the question, ‘where is my gratitude? Do I embody it not only in words, which are rare enough, but in deeds?’ Let us pass judgement on ourselves and start a new life. Gratitude to God consists in being a joy to Him, and to our neighbor a support, a savior and a joy. Let us begin today to bear the fruits of what we have just learned from God through Christ. Amen.

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NATIVITY OF THE MOTHER OF GOD
By Metropolitan Anthony of Sourozh
A Sermon delivered on 21 September, 1971

In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.

I should like to say a few words about the greatness of this feast. When a man surveys this world in which we live, which is so vast, seemingly boundless, and looks at himself in it, he feels very small and insignificant. And if he adds to this the hardness and coldness of men, he may sometimes feel extremely vulnerable, helpless and unprotected both before people and before the terrifying vastness of the world.
Yet at the same time if a man looks at himself not in relation to his surroundings, but goes deep into himself, he will there discover such an expanse, such depths, that the whole created world is too small to fill it. Man sees the beauty of the world —  and the vision does not completely satisfy him; he learns an enormous amount about God's creation — and the knowledge does not fill him to the brim. Neither human joy nor even human sorrow can completely fill a man, because in him is a depth that exceeds everything created; because God made man so vast, so deep, so limitless in his spiritual being, that nothing in the world can finally satisfy him except God Himself.
Today's feast of the Mother of God demonstrates this fact with particular beauty and splendor. She so believed in God, She gave herself to Him with such a pure mind and pure heart, with an unwavering will, with the purity of Her virginity and life, such that She was granted to say the Name of God perfectly, with such love that the Word became flesh and God was made man in Her.
Through this we are shown that not only is the soul, the inner being and spirit of man, so created by God that it can contain the mystery of a meeting with the living God, but that even the body is so made that in an unfathomable way it can be united with the living God. Indeed, according to St. Peter we are called to become partakers of the divine nature; according to St. Paul our vocation is to become temples of the Holy Spirit. The whole of the New Testament teaches us that we are the Body, the living tremulous Body of Christ, through baptism and through Holy Communion. How wonderful this is, and therefore with what reverence must we regard not only our immortal soul, but this body of ours which is called to rise again, to enter the Kingdom of God and be glorified, like the body of Christ.
In the 11th century St. Simeon the New Theologian wrote one day when he had returned to his humble cell after receiving Holy Communion, words to this effect, "I look upon this corruptible body, upon this frail flesh, and I tremble, because by partaking of the Holy Mysteries it has been permeated by God, it has been united with Christ, it is overflowing with the Holy Spirit... these powerless hands have become the hands of God, this body has become a body that God has taken possession of."
Consider what has been given us not only by our faith, but by the sacraments of the Church; the immersion in the blessed waters of baptism makes us particles, living members of Christ's Body, the anointing with holy chrism is not only the visible seal of the Holy Spirit, but makes us the temples in which He dwells. When the bread and wine which are offered by our faith and love to God are consecrated, they become incomprehensibly and mysteriously the Body and Blood of Christ, and this created matter partakes of Christ and imparts to us, who are incapable of soaring to God in spirit, the divinity of Christ, which saves and transfigures us in soul and body.
This feast of Nativity of the Mother of God is the time when we remember the birth of the One who for the sake of us all, for the whole human race, was able to show such faith, to surrender so absolutely to God, that He could become Man through Her, and bring us these manifold, unfathomable gifts. Glory to Her humility, glory to Her faith, glory to Her love, glory to God Who was incarnate and to the Virgin Mother of God, the worthy vessel of the incarnation of the Son of God, Christ our God! Amen.

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MESSAGE FOR THE DAY OF THE PROTECTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT
By: Patriarch BARTHOLOMEW of Constantinople
September 1st, 2011

God’s grace renders us worthy today to commence yet another ecclesiastical year, one more festive cycle, within whose blessed opportunities we are called to struggle spiritually in order better to evaluate the potential that we have been granted for growing “in the likeness” of God so that we also might become His saints.

However, today, on September 1st, the first day of the church year, is also dedicated — at the initiative of the Ecumenical Patriarchate — to prayer for the natural environment. This pioneering decision is by no means unrelated to the beginning of the new ecclesiastical year inasmuch as the spiritual struggle that brings about the good transformation of the human person contributes to the improvement of our relationship with the environment and the cultivation of our sensitivity for its protection and preservation.

Therefore, today, we praise the holy name of God for granting to humanity the gift of nature, which he preserves and sustains, as the most suitable environment for human beings to develop in body and spirit. A the same time, we cannot remain silent about the fact that humanity does not properly honor this divine gift and instead destroys the environment through greed and other selfish ambitions.

As we know well, our environment consists of land, water, sun, air, but also of fauna and flora. Humankind can take advantage of nature for its own benefit, but only up to a certain point, so that it may blossom and so that it may have the opportunity to propagate the consumed energy resources as well as the living, animal creatures. In any case, the proper exploitation of nature comprises a commandment of God both before and after the fall of Adam. Yet, the extreme exploitation — which is, unfortunately, a phenomenon of the last two centuries in human history — destroys the balanced harmony of nature and leads to the exhaustion and destruction of nature as well as of humanity itself, since we cannot survive in an ecosystem whose balance has been irreversibly injured. The result of this phenomenon is the appearance and proliferation of illnesses caused by the pollution of nutritional goods through human actions.

In our time, there is appropriate emphasis on the vast significance of forests and generally of plants for the flourishing of the earth’s ecosystem as well as for the protection of water resources. But we cannot undermine the crucial importance of animals, too, for the orderly function of the world. Animals have always been friends of humanity and servants of human needs, providing food, clothing, transportation but also protection and affection. Man’s relationship with animals has been very close, as demonstrated by the fact that they were created on the same day as Adam and Eve (Gen. 1:31) and by God’s commandment to Noah to save each species of the animals in pairs before the great flood (Gen. 6:19). It is characteristic that God reserves special care for the preservation of the animal kingdom. In the lives of the saints, there are numerous stories about the excellent relations between saints and wild beasts, which would not normally be associated with friendliness toward human beings. This, of course, is not due to an evil nature on the part of animals but to our resistance to God’s grace and the consequences of this for our relationship with the elements and animals. After all, one of the results of Adam and Eve breaking their relationship to their Creator God was the disruption of their relationship with the environment: “Cursed is the ground because of you; in toil you shall eat of it all the days of your life; thorns and thistles it shall bring forth for you; and you shall eat the plants of the field. By the sweat of your face you shall eat bread until you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken” (Gen. 3:17-19). Man’s reconciliation with God results in man’s reconciliation with nature.

After all this, it is clear that our good relationship with the environment develops parallel to our proper relationship with God. We all know the story from the lives of the saints about the experience of St. Anthony the Great, who at the age of ninety decided, with the guidance of the Lord’s angel, to enter the deeper desert of the Nile in search of another hermit, St. Paul of Thebes, in order to benefit spiritually from the latter. After walking for three days and following the tracks of animals, he came across a lion that bowed before St. Anthony and turned around to lead him to St. Paul’s cave, where he found the hermit being served by animals. A crow would bring him his daily bread! In fact, on the day of St. Anthony’s visit, the crow brought a double portion so as to provide for the visitor!

These saints developed a good relationship with God, which meant that they also enjoyed a good relationship with all of nature. The creation of such a good relationship with God should become our foremost priority, while the attending good relationship with the animal, natural and inanimate world should flow spontaneously from this. In this perspective, love for animals will not simply comprise a sterile social expression of compassion for our favorite animals, which might even sadly be accompanied by indifference for suffering human beings, who are created in the image of God, but the result of our good relationship with the Creator of all.

May the Creator of the “very beautiful” universe (Gen. 1.31) and the wonderful earthly ecosystem inspire all of us to treat all the elements of nature with affection, with a compassionate heart for all human beings, animals and plants, just as Abba Isaac the Syrian once replied to the question: “What is a merciful heart?” “It is a heart burning for the sake of the entire creation, for men, for birds, for animals, for demons and for every created thing; and by the recollection and sight of them the eyes of a merciful man pour forth abundant tears. From the strong and vehement mercy gripping his heart and from his great compassion, his heart is humbled and he cannot bear to hear or see any injury or slight sorrow in creation” (Ascetic Treatise 81).

Through such compassion toward the natural creation we shall honor our divine dignity as stewards of creation, concerned with paternal love for all its elements, which will obey us when they discern our benevolent disposition as they realize their own commission to serve our needs.
(Source: http://www.patriarchate.org/documents/2011-ecclesiastical-new-year)

[PRINTED BULLETIN PAGE 6]

MY PRAYER JOURNAL

“My Prayer Journal” is a 32-page, 5¼ x 8¼ booklet published annually by the IOCC (International Orthodox Christian Charities) to help children (ages 7-12) learn to pray daily, including praying for needy children in various parts of the world. To achieve their goal, the booklet contains daily prayers for the children, in addition to a monthly 2-page spread portraying children in different countries, and describing how the IOCC is helping them. On the first Sunday of each month,  we will have in our bulletin the photos and text for that month’s country. You may request a single free copy of “My Prayer Journal” on-line at: https://www.iocc.org/news/prayerjournal.aspx

SEPTEMBER 2014 — BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

Brothers Marko and Jovan live in Bosnia, an Eastern European country formed in 1995 after a war broke  up the former country of Yugoslavia. Many of the new country’s families had trouble finding jobs after the war. The boy’s parents had a small farm, but needed help to buy pigs and sheep to replace those that were lost during the war. IOCC helped their other, Jovanka, with a loan of $7,000 to buy piglets that they would raise and sell.  The money she borrowed and paid back came from IOCC’s micro-credit program that helps people in Bosnia start small businesses to support their families and creates new jobs for other families. The program has helped create more than 8,000 jobs since 2002.

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PATRIARCH KIRILL AGAIN CALLS ON UN, COUNCIL OF EUROPE, OSCE TO HELP STOP FIGHTING IN UKRAINE    

Moscow, August 25, Interfax — Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and All Russia expects a response from the international organizations that he earlier addressed with regard to the continuing violence in Ukraine. "How many churches can be destroyed and how many people can be killed? I am expecting a response from the UN, the Council of Europe, and the OSCE, whose top officials I have called on to stop the bloodshed [in Ukraine], in which Orthodox Christians are being killed," the patriarch said on Sunday following a liturgy he served in the Nikolo-Peshnoshsky Monastery in the Moscow region.
Patriarch Kirill earlier called on the leaders of the organizations mentioned above to protect the parishioners and clergy of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church from persecution. He pointed out the death of some Ukrainian Orthodox Church clergymen, instances of violence against clergymen, attempts to intimidate them, and the large-scale physical damage done to Orthodox churches and monasteries in Ukraine.
According to earlier reports, a shell broke the roof of the John of Kronstadt Church in the city of Kirovskoye and the roof fell on the people praying on Saturday. Three people were killed instantly and the priest, his wife and four parishioners were hospitalized with injuries. "I don't believe that a shell could have been dropped on a church accidentally, I don't believe an Orthodox Christian could have done that. But I know how angry people who do not belong to our church are. And it is possible that by targeting that church they targeted all of us, all Holy Rus, all historical Rus, which has been targeted many times throughout our history," the patriarch said.
He promised to work with the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate to do everything to stop the bloodshed.

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UKRAINIAN ARMY DELIBERATELY TARGETS ORTHODOX CHURCHES — ARCHBISHOP OF GORLOVKA
Moscow, August 25, Interfax — Archbishop of Gorlovka and Slavyansk, Mitrofan, believes the war in Ukraine has now reached a point where it cannot be stopped by human forces alone.
"I want to say: "Guys, throw down your guns, hug each other, forgive each other and begin building a peaceful life. But I know that, unfortunately, no one will hear me: the level of tensions is now such that we can only pray for this level to go down and for the bloodshed to stop. I don't see any human forces that could stop it. Only the Lord can do it with His power," the Archbishop said in a phone conversation with Interfax-Religion.
The congregation of an Orthodox church in the Donetsk region was attacked again on Saturday. A shell broke the roof of the John of Kronstadt Church in the city of Kirovskoye and the roof fell on the people praying. Three people were killed instantly and the priest, his wife and four parishioners were hospitalized with injuries.
The Archbishop believes the attacks on churches are deliberate. "When the number of churches bombed and burned becomes so huge and people are killed, we, of course, get the feeling that churches are becoming the targets, bearing in mind that in none of these situations there were any checkpoints, military equipment, or some headquarters near our churches," he said.

[PRINTED BULLETIN PAGE 7]

CANDLES FOR LAST SUNDAY, 31 AUGUST
CHURCH VIGIL LAMPS:    
Royal Doors Lamp:In Memory of Husband Joe; Son Kenneth; parents Michael & Margaret Rusko & John & Martha Nossal, by Rose Nossal
Altar Candles: In Memory of Nicholas and Susan Yakuber, by son, Donald Yakuber        
Iconostasis Lamps: In Memory of Irene Adams, by daughter, Eileen Adams
Candles on the Solea: In Memory of Pete & Theresa Harvilla, Norman & Monica Holst, & Ricky Ellis, by Jason & Debra Truskowski    
Nave Reliquary-Icon Lamps: (1) In Memory of Ross & Margaret Falsetti, by daughters, Margie Martell & Rose Ann Everhardt
Nave Reliquary-Icon Lamps: (2) Anonymous
Table of Oblation LampIn Memory of parents, Helen & John Andrayko, Sr. & sister, Carole Andrayko, by John Andrayko, Jr.

IN MEMORY OF (MEMORY ETERNAL!):                                        
Joseph & Estelle Star, by son Father Roman and family
Paul & Alexandra Yupco, Basil & Ellen Starinshak, by grandson, Father Roman and family
John & Anna Witkowski, by daughter, Matushka Rose Marie and family
Samuel & Mary Kupec, by granddaughter, Matushka Rose Marie and family
Parents, Helen & John Andrayko and sister, Carole Andrayko, by John Andrayko        
My husband, Joe; my sisters, Margaret & Ross Falsetti, Anna & Mike Elaschat, Theresa & Pete Harvilla, Irene, & brothers, Michael & John Rusko; niece, Rose Mary Hough; Joe’s brothers, Raymond & Walter Nossal, & sisters, Theresa, Florence & Helen Nossal, by Rose Nossal
Pete & Theresa Harvilla, by Mary Ann Harvilla & Kay Truskowski  + + + My husband, Michael Rusko, by Joan Rusko
Parents, Ethel Elizabeth & Wayne Joshua deVyver; David Horka; Marion P; Nina I; Fr. Photius; Mother Benedicta; Popadia Vera Nicoloff (8/24); Michelle Tucker, by Sister Ioanna  + + + Child Lana Wilson, Shirley Troyer, Michelle Tucker, Wendell Phillips, by Becky Jurczyszyn & Levi Troyer + + + Sister, Michelle Tucker, by Fr. Daneil + + +  Thelma Ratcliff, Louis Pitts, T.F. Shelton, Gloria Robinson, Reginald Bell, Lessie Favor, by Manier Family

FOR THE HEALTH OF (MANY YEARS!):         
Elizabeth, Caitlin & Zachary, by parents & grandparents, Father Roman & Matushka Rose Marie
Gregory & Tamiko Star, by parents, Father Roman & Matushka Rose Marie        
Children & Grandchildren; Monk Fr. Tikhon (Dade); Dean Hough, by Rose Nossal
Father Roman & Matushka & family; Sister Ioanna; John Andrayko; Nancy; Mary G; Jo Anne N; Grandson Joey (in the Navy Reserves) & all people in the Armed Forces; & all the people of St. Innocent Church, by Rose  Nossal  + + + My Mom, Jaime Truskowski, by Kay Truskowski + + + Family & Friends, Aunt Rose, by Mary Ann Harvilla & Kay T. + + + Brother, Greg & Donna, Gregory & Liz & Alex, by Mary Ann Harvilla & Kay Truskowski + + + Archimandrites Roman, Nafanail & Gregory; Igumen Seraphim; Fr. Roman & Mat. Rose Marie; Fr. Lawrence & fam; Fr. Daneil & fam; Dcn. Michael & fam; Mat. Melania S; Mat. Mary D; Carl; Fr. Tikhon; Sdn Andrew; Rdr Robert; Robert M; David Samuel & Sky; JoAnne & Nick; Martha; Athanasius; John A; Lena N; Jillian J; Ed & Tiffany; Vasiliki; Rose; Emil; Mo.Theodora-Amphilochia, by Sister Ioanna + + + Joan Jurczyszyn, Betty Stelmaszek, Leia Wilson, Richard Bussen, by Becky Jurczyszyn & Levi + + + Health of: Manier family, Samantha Ketelson (Infant w/ hypo-thyroidism) + + + Salvation of: Brittany, Eddie, Breonna, Bronte, Kaitlyn, RJ, Xavior, Storie, Robert, Candice, Kevin, Cynthia, Demarion, Desmond, & Shelton Family, by Manier family

PROSFORA FOR TODAY IS OFFERED by: Deborah Hartz
in Memory Eternal of: Paul & Bernadette (parents); Infants Mark & Barbara; John & Elizabeth; Phillip & Hilda; Edward & Irene; Caroline & Louis; Agnes & August; Charles & Stephen; & all members of the Hartz, Zwilcher, Smith, Nied & Fisher families; and for the Health of: Fr. Roman Braga; Mother Gabriella & all the sisters of HDM; Father Roman & Matushka Rose Marie; Larry & Elizabeth & family; Elaine; Sherri. 

PROSFORA SCHEDULE:  2014September: Deborah Hartz; October: John Andrayko: November: Sr. Ioanna; December: Nicholas Family.

Offering the Holy Bread that will become the Sacred Body of Christ and received in Holy Communion is a great honor and privilege, and it is a wonderful way to commemorate one’s living and departed loved ones. It also is a very meaningful way of celebrating special events, such as birthdays & anniversaries, graduations, weddings, births & baptisms.  Donations are $25 for a month.
PROSFORA SCHEDULE: 2015: January: John Andrayko & Sister Ioanna; February: Matushka Rose Marie; March: Libby Glover-Booher; April: available; May: Vasiliki Stamoulis; June: John Andrayko; July: Matushka Rose Marie; August: Sister Ioanna; September: available; October: John Andrayko; November: Sister Ioanna; December: Nicholas Family.  PLEASE SIGN UP NOW FOR REMAINING 2 MONTHS IN 2015.

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

(1) OUR WEEKLY BULLETIN IS NOW AVAILABLE ON-LINE & IS NO LONGER BEING MAILED TO EVERYONE
Now that it is not necessary to print as many copies of the bulletin, because it is being e-mailed to those who are not in church, the number of pages in the printed bulletin has been increased from 4 to 6. On our church website, http://www.stinnocentchurch.com, under the “Weekly Bulletin” tab, and the separate sub-page for each week, you will find not only what is in each week’s printed bulletin, but at the bottom, you will also have what does not fit in the 6 pages . Since the last Sunday in July, we have been e-mailing the website link each week for that week’s on-line bulletin to all our parishioners and friends of the parish for whom we have e-mail addresses, while those who are at church can also get their printed bulletin in person. Anyone without a computer and e-mail, naturally, will continue to receive the printed bulletin by postal mail when they are not in church. RSVP: We still need one e-mail address: Pat Harbut. Please communicate any change in e-mail address to Sister Ioanna, preferably by e-mail: sisterioanna@firebirdvideos.com.   If you do not have working e-mail, please call: 313-535-9080.

(2) OUR ANNUAL BLANKET DRIVE CONTINUES. PLEASE GIVE YOUR DONATIONS NOW
Our annual Fall Blanket Drive continues. We now have 62 money donations and  3 actual blankets, and thus need only 35 more to meet our goal of 100+ blankets for the poor and homeless, to be distributed primarily through RIR (Redford Interfaith Relief). This year you don’t even have to go the store and buy blankets. Anna Margaret Costa will place an order at the Walmart with which she deals, where the manager is very sympathetic to our blankets-for-the-poor drive, and who made a big blanket donation last year. He asked Anna Margaret to let him know in August (and it is obviously now September) how many blankets to order, so he can make sure he gets in enough blankets. So please give your donation NOW for this order. Blankets are $5. Thank you for your generosity — both parishioners and those outside the parish who receive our bulletins, printed or on-line.

[PRINTED BULLETIN PAGE 8]

SCHEDULE OF UP-COMING SERVICES, FEASTS & EVENTS
(In addition to regular weekly: 7pm Wednesday Service; 4pm Saturday Great Vespers; 10am Sunday Liturgy)
Sunday, September 7th, 6pm, GREAT VESPERS FOR THE GREAT FEAST OF THE NATIVITY OF THE THEOTOKOS
Monday, September 8th, 9am, DIVINE LITURGY FOR THE GREAT FEAST OF THE NATIVITY OF THE THEOTOKOS
Tuesday, September 9th, 7pm, Monthly COCC meeting, at St. Michael’s Church, W. Chicago, Redford
Saturday, September 13th, 4pm, GREAT VESPERS & LITIYA FOR THE GREAT FEAST OF THE ELEVATION OF THE CROSS
Sunday, September 14th, GREAT FEAST OF THE ELEVATION/EXALTATION OF T HE HOLY CROSS (Liturgy as usual)
Sunday, September 21st, After Coffee-Hour (1:00), Monthly Pot-Luck, Fellowship & Discussion #4, at St. Innocent ReligiousCommunity
Wednesday, October 1st, 9am, DIVINE LITURGY FOR THE FEAST OF THE PROTECTION (POKROV) OF THE THEOTOKOS
Sunday, October 19th, After Coffee-Hour (1:00), Monthly Pot-Luck, Fellowship & Discussion #5, at St. Innocent Religious Community

FR. ROMAN’S ADDITIONAL SCHEDULE

Thursday, September 18th, noon – 2:00, Redford Ministerial Alliance Monthly Meeting, at Prayer Temple, 27350 W. Chicago @ Inkster

Thursday–Saturday, October 2nd–4th, 21st Annual Ancient Christianity Conference (National Brotherhood of St. Moses the Black), Lima, OH
Saturday–Sunday, October 4th–5th, Annual Patronal Feastday Pilgrimage (O.S.), Holy Cross Monastery, Wayne, WV
Wednesday, October 8th, Hierarchal Divine Liturgy, Patronal Feastday (O.S.), St. Sergius Cathedral, Parma, OH
Thursday, October 9th, Divine Liturgy, Patronal Feastday (O.S.), St. John the Theologian Monastery, Hiram, OH
Tuesday, October 14th, Hierarchal Divine Liturgy, Patronal Feastday (O.S.), Pokrov/Protection Cathedral, Des Plaines (Chicago), IL
Monday, October 20th, 10:30am, Give OCW presentation, St. Maria of Paris, the “Rebel Nun,” at St. Thomas Albanian Church, Farm. Hills

Saturday & Sunday, November 15th-16th, Nativity of Christ Church, Youngstown, OH; Vespers (Sat.) & Liturgy(Sun.), Dean’s Visitation
Friday & Saturday, November 28th-29th , Vespers & Presentation (Fri.) & Liturgy (Sat.), Dean’s Visitation

ANNOUNCEMENTS (continued from previous page)

(3) THANK YOU TO THOSE WHO HAVE MOWED OUR CHURCH YARD & WORKED IN OUR GARDENS.
We continue to thank for their on-going sacrificial labors in taking care of and beautifying our church property: John Andrayko & Reader George Hanoian, who mowed, edged, and cleaned-up the lawn; and Matushka Rose Marie & Fr. Roman for their usual work in weeding, and general maintenance of the flower gardens. We always still desperately need some more volunteers to help maintain our beautiful church’s property.  Please offer to come for a few hours and help. Thank you very much!

(4) NEXT MEETING OF MONTHLY POT-LUCK & DISCUSSION GROUP TO BE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st
Our monthly pot-luck lunch and discussion group that has been formed has met so far on June 22nd, July 13th and August 10th. It will continue to meet for a lively, thought-provoking discussion following a casual pot-luck lunch, on one Sunday (2nd or 3rd) a month after coffee hour, at the St. Innocent Religious Community. The fellowship, discussion and food are all most enjoyable and pleasant. The next gatherings will be on September 21st, October 19th, and November 9th. All are welcome. Mark your calendars.  The main topic of  discussion at our  next  meeting will be our relationship with the environment and its protection, because Septmeber 1st is dedicated to the protection of the environment.  We will use Patriarch Bartholomew's statement  from  2011 (read it pages 5 & 6 of this week's bulletin) as a basis of  our discussion.       

(5) COCC ANNUAL BENEFIT CHOIR CONCERT, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th, AT 6:30, IN SOUTHFIELD
Do mark your calendars and plan to attend the COCC (Council of Orthodox Christian Churches of Metro-Detroit) -sponsored free 4th Annual Choir Concert on Sunday, September 28th, at 6:30 pm. It is to be held at St. Mary the Protectress Ukrainian Orthodox Cathedral, 21931 Evergreen, between 8 and 9 Mile Roads in Southfield, 48075. Free-will donations will be requested, and the donations will help those suffering in the Middle East, Ukraine and North Africa,  through the IOCC (International Orthodox  Christian Charities). The concert will be sung by the superb COCC-sponsored Orthodox Choir of Detroit, directed by Matushka Vickie Kopistiansky. Our Elizabeth Star sings with this excellent choir. This is the fourth year that the COCC has had a benefit choir concert in the Fall to aid various Orthodox charities.

(6) GOOD NEWS! OUR LOCAL ODO HAS MERGED WITH FOCUS NORTH AMERICA!
It is wonderful news to learn that as of September 3rd, FOCUS North America (Fellowship of Orthodox Christians United to Serve) has accepted our local ODO (Orthodox Detroit Outreach) to merge with it. This means that the ODO is now the FOCUS North America Center here in Detroit. To establish a Detroit FOCUS North America Center has been a goal that Fr. Roman and others have sought to achieve for a number of years. It was to this end that Fr. Roman, as President of the Clergy Brotherhood and Spiritual Advisor of the COCC, had invited the then Director of FOCUS to come to Detroit and speak at the Lenten Clergy Retreat and Lenten Vespers in March of 2011. FOCUS North America is THE primary Orthodox agency that develops programs to serve the poor in about 12 major metropolitan areas in the U.S. It was blessed by SCOBA (now, the Assembly of Orthodox Bishops), and has some substantial funding by Orthodox philanthropists, although local fund-raising is still crucial for regular functioning. Hopefully, FOCUS will provide necessary financial aid to expand the work that ODO has been faithfully doing for 3 years.

New ministries and volunteer opportunities for individuals and parishes alike will be publicized as soon as plans are made. In the meantime, all existing ODO/FOCUS ministries will continue as scheduled. This includes serving a hot meal to the local needy residents and homeless every Sunday at Ss. Peter and Paul in Detroit; preparing bag lunches and breakfasts on the first Saturday of each month at various Orthodox churches; and sponsoring a community garden. To learn more about the ODO, visit their facebook page or website: www.orthodoxdetroitoutreach.org and to learn more about FOCUS North America, visit their website: http://focusnorthamerica.org/  If you would like to do more in a hands-on way to help the poor, needy, hungry and homeless in our community, and put your Orthodox faith into action, consider volunteering to help the ODO/FOCUS. Parish sponsors for the weekly lunch in SW Detroit are always needed --- sign up your parish to come and serve. They especially always need volunteers on Sundays from 1 to 3:00 to prepare and serve meals to the needy at Ss. Peter & Paul Church, 3700 Gilbert Street, near Livernois & Michigan, in Detroit. Contact St. Innocent Church’s good friend, Janet Damian (janet@orthodoxdetroitoutreach.org, or call her at  313-706-0666).

GLORY TO JESUS CHRIST!  ❈ GLORY FOREVER!   

ADDITIONAL MATERIALS, NOT IN PRINTED BULLETIN — ANNOUNCEMENTS:

(7) PHOTO SLIDESHOW OF WEDDING PHOTOS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSITE

A slideshow of 101 photos of  Elizabeth and Larry's wedding  that  was  celebrated on Saturday, August 23rd at St. Innocent  Church is now available to view on our website, under the Photos & News tab. Click on the link to go right to it. http://www.stinnocentchurch.com/wedding_elizabeth_larry.html You can view the pix automatically or manually. Enjoy!

 

(8) NEXT SUNDAY, 9/14, IS A MAJOR FEASTDAY — EXALTATION / ELEVATION OF THE HOLY CROSS

The Exaltation or Elevation of the Holy Cross, celebrated every year on September 14th, is one of the great  feastdays of the year. Usually it falls on a weekday, when it is difficult for most people to get to church. This year, it falls on a Sunday — next Sunday. Take advantage of this opportunity to worship before Christ's cross on this glorious feastday by  making a point to come to Divine LIturgy next Sunday, the 14th, and to Great Vespers on Saturday, when the cross is brought out in procession.

To prepare in advance for the feast, you might like to learn more about the historical basis of the feast, by reading this article:http://oca.org/saints/lives/2014/09/14/102610-the-universal-exaltation-of-the-precious-and-life-giving-cross

And to learn more about the spiritual meaning of the feast, read a sermon by St. John Maximovitch of San Francisco and Shanghai, entitled, "The Cross, the Preserver of the Universe" at http://oca.org/fs/sermons/the-cross-the-preserver-of-the-universe

(9) ON-GOING CHARITABLE WORKS AT ST. INNOCENT
(1) Please continue to help the needy in our community by bringing in food, clothing, toiletries, household items, children’s toys, school supplies, etc., most of which is delivered to the REDFORD INTERFAITH RELIEF (RIR), a local organization run by Redford churches, of which St. Innocent is a very active member. They also welcome household, family & children’s items. (2) Also we continue, as always, to collect donations for the OCMC (Orthodox Christian Missions Center) CANISTER PROGRAM (to support mission priests). (The OCMC canister is by the candle stand.) (3) Please also continue to bring in your empty, clean pop cans and bottles, the refund from which we send to the ST.  INNOCENT BOYS’ ORPHANAGE IN TIJUANA, MEXICO, as we have been doing for about  8-9 years. (4) And your USED EYE GLASSES are given to the Lions Club’s Eyes for the Needy program, and volunteers fix them up and distribute eyeglasses to the needy in 3rd- world countries.

(10) LATEST ISSUE OF THE COCC’S “GOOD WORKS” TO BE AVAILABLE THIS WEEK
The  most recent issue (September–October) of  “Good Works” —  the highly successful newsletter/ periodical of the Council of Orthodox Christian Churches of Metro-Detroit (COCC) should be available this coming week  (pick-up at COCC  meeting on Tuesday, 9/9). Therefore we should have it to distribute next weekend. Look for it on the right end of the front pew, by the window, behind the current week’s Sunday bulletins. (If you would like a printed B&W copy mailed to you, please notify Sister Ioanna at sisterioanna@firebirdvideos.) The now 20-page, 8½ x 11 publication is now being published every 2 months. Thus it will be published 6 times a year instead of 4 times. Make a point of getting your copy of each new issue each time it comes out, so you can enjoy reading the very diverse articles, news and announcements about the Orthodox community in southeast Michigan. Look in it for our St. Innocent contribution,  the article, "What is the Meaning and Purpose of Life?" You can also read (some of) the issues in color on the COCC’s website: http://www.coccdetroit.com.

OTHER SPIRITUALLY EDIFYING MATERIALS NOT IN THIS WEEK'S PRINTED BULLETIN

(1) For the 9th and final prayer in our series of 9 Prayers for the Journey Along THE WAY, Prayer #9, "DEATH," go to the page on our website, http://www.stinnocentchurch.com/prayer_death.html

(2) Our latest new article, written for the September-October issue of the COCC's GOOD WORKS periodical, that should be printed by now, is available for you to read on our website. The very interesting title is "WHAT IS THE MEANING AND PURPOSE OF LIFE?" Check it out  here: http://www.stinnocentchurch.com/whatisthemeaningandpurposeoflife.html

(3)  Last Monday, September 1st,  was the beginning of the new Church Year — the ecclesiastical New Year's day, and is also called the "Indiction." To learn about the history behind the church new year being observed on September 1st, go to: http://oca.org/saints/lives/2014/09/01/501-church-new-year

(4)  This coming Monday, September 8th, will be the celebration of one of  the Church's 12 Major Feast Days,  the Nativity of the Mother of God.  To prepare yourself in advance about the meaning of this feastday, go to: http://oca.org/saints/lives/2014/09/08/102541-the-nativity-of-our-most-holy-lady-the-mother-of-god-and-ever-vi

(5) Also read a sermon by  Fr. Alexander Schmemann about this feast here: http://oca.org/fs/sermons/sermon-on-the-nativity-of-the-theotokos